How do you choose the right precious metal and colour for you?

Helen Says

“Just as the website has outlined, I like to consider both the aesthetic and inherent properties of the metal.

In terms of appearance, first of all think about your skin tone, what will complement and look like it most ‘belongs’?  There is no hard and fast rule as everyone is individual, you may wish to contrast a cool white against your complexion, or the yellow tones of gold may add some warmth.  Try on both and all options and keep an open mind.

Matching?

It is always advisable to stick to the same precious metal in wedding ring as your engagement ring.  Although accounts how metals react when sitting next to each other will vary, it is always best practice to duplicate when you can.  You may also wish to match with a favourite piece or collection of jewellery.  For gentlemen, a wedding ring is often the first and only piece of jewellery worn and so my advice is to consider complementing a favourite watch.

Gold carat choices?

This choice is a payoff, as the percentage content of gold increases, so does the price and inherent ‘yellowness’.  22ct carat gold is soft, it looks like butter and can feel like silk, it is so strikingly beautiful but will need treating with care and respect when worn.  By contrast the advantage of 9ct gold is the cost, but this may be at the compromise of the colour as 9ct gold can appear slightly ‘brassy’ in appearance.  18ct gold often strikes the balance and is the fineness of choice for quality jewellery, having an ideal balance of beauty, strength and durability.

Coloured Gold

Rose gold is often a luxurious choice of setting as it provides a beautiful contrast to white diamonds.  Also the addition of copper (which provides the red tones) also adds strength and durability.

White and Yellow Gold Wedding Ring

Credit: Dominio

Platinum or White gold?

As platinum is the rarest and purest of the precious metals, consequently it is often the most expensive.  It has however, so many positive attributes and desirable properties to justify the investment. In its pure form platinum is harder than even alloyed gold.  Its superior strength makes it perfect for delicate and intricate jewellery, in addition inherent whiteness is an ideal setting for diamonds.  It is also truly hypoallergenic, so will not irritate ladies or gents with sensitive skin.

All precious metals scratch, but platinum’s density and weight makes it more durable and it possesses what is known as a ‘liquid surface’.  This means that it does not chip, the metal is simply dispersed, so when the ring is refinished it is simply pushed back into place.

By contrast white gold will scratch more easily, these can be ‘buffed’ out if desired.  Lower grade white gold alloys will require a rhodium plating.  Once completed this creates a whiter appearance than that of platinum.    Although Rhodium is a hard metal, over time it will wear, re-plating times will vary also depending on use, but it may need to be undertaken every 12 months.

Do remember the high surface polish or surface patina when you first buy your wedding rings will not last.   In terms of wear and tear it may seem a little odd, but I’m actually quite fond of the worn and scratched appearance of jewellery – just as in life we go through challenges and hard knocks so will your rings and I therefore find this quite symbolic.

Over polishing over time will also (in the case of gold), remove some of the surface layers.  I would however safely advise that you can polish your engagement just before your wedding to match and ensure they ‘age’ at the same time.  It is also not detrimental to polish rings at special anniversaries such as 10 years or at 25 years, a lovely gesture for a silver wedding anniversary

In conclusion, the information above is to help you make an informed choice and educated choice, but combine this with our own preferences so you purchase what you can afford and genuinely love”.